NOURIS2H Assignment
How to Write a Blog Post


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And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus,
giving thanks to God the Father through him.” Col 3: 17

What does NOURIS2H stand for?

Nutrition
This course is about food. That is pretty obvious. But it is not just a course about cooking food and eating it. It also isn't just about knowing what is in your food and what is good for you and what isn't. It isn't just about eating healthy so that we have a good quality of life. This course might be focused on those things, but it isn't just about those things. In a secular public school, it might be. In our school, there is a difference. There is a difference because our worldview is different.
In Matt 6: 25, Christ says, “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?” Christ knows us. He created us. He was one of us. He knew hunger and thirst, and cared for his disciples when they did. After His resurrection, He met his disciples after they had been fishing all night, and gave them breakfast (John 21: 9-12). However, He also provides some else for His people, telling them that physical food and drink is not enough when He says “I am the Bread of Life” (John 6: 35) and offers us “living water” (John 4:10). He provides nutrition for the soul.
As Christians, we believe that our lives have a larger purpose than just getting from one day to the next, we have more to do than just enjoy the pleasures that life can offer. In 1 Cor 15: 32b, Paul says in his argument about the importance of belief in the resurrection, “If the dead are not raised, 'Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die,'” making it clear that we as Christians have a more important goal in life. We are called to live in faith in God, as pilgrims who desire a better country (Heb 11:16).

Others
This one is all about loving our neighbours as ourselves. Making and serving food is a way to show, tangibly, love for our neighbours. We give of ourselves and our time. Food can easily become a selfish thing. We can hoard it from others, keeping a stash of candy or chocolate or that last slice of cake hidden away so that only we can enjoy it. “It's mine!” can become a frequent saying in regards to food. It can become an idol. It can become the thing that we run to for comfort instead of God. But food and other “things” will never fill the God-shaped hole in each of us.
By serving others, we can show and share the love of God with them. It reminds us that what we do in life is not just about us. Jesus humbled Himself to serve His disciples by washing their feet (John 13:2-15) and told them, verse 15, “I have given you an example, that you also should do just as I have done to you.” Jesus took on such a humble service, one that people in those times saw as demeaning, and did not demand that He be served. Christ was willing to humble Himself to die for His creation (Phil 2:18) and He calls us as Christians to humble ourselves after His example: we must die to self.
Something to ponder: How can you “wash the feet” of someone in your life today?

Upbuilding
Romans 15:2 “Let each of us please his neighbour for his good, to build him up.” Building each other up is part of our work as Christians. We are called to be the family of God, upbuilding the church. As Christians we are also called to witness to the world of Christ and His Redeeming Love. Even something as simple as a meal can be a witness to the world. In our community it is common to begin and end our meals by giving thanks to God for His blessings. Family devotions around the supper table can be a witness to non-Christians who join us for supper.
How we live our lives should be a witness to the world, but sometimes we forget that we are also called to build up each other in the faith. One way we can do this is through up-building words and actions. We should strive to speak words of light, not of darkness, showing love in our language. It may be “fun” to tease someone and put them down as a “joke,” but it is usually not fun for the person being teased and it can result in real heart hurt for that person. The same thing applies to our actions: we should not tear others down, but build them up in everything we do. What we do not say or do can tell people more about us than what we do. The world should “know we are Christians by our love.”
Something to ponder: How can you build up the people in your life?


Relationship
Food is an intimate thing. It is something that becomes a part of us. This is probably one of the reasons that Christ instituted the Lord's Supper: the bread and the wine are concrete symbols of our participation in His sacrifice, they become part of us, even as they symbolize how His sacrifice redeemed us from our old, sinful flesh.
We are called to be in relationship with the Lord (Westminster Shorter Catechism: “Q.1. What is the chief end of man? A. Man's chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy Him forever.”)--Jesus calls us brothers--and He calls us to be in relationship with other believers (Heb 10: 24-25 “And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near”).
Relationships with lasting bonds are formed by spending time with other people. Family meals are important because you are spending time with one another, enjoying each others' company. You are, in fact, fellowshipping with them.


Image Bearers
This one refers to our call to demonstrate our character as Christians and image bearers of Christ. We were created in God's image (Gen 1:27) and are called to glorify Him in our lives. As people called of God, we must follow Christ's example, moulding ourselves “being conformed” (Romans 8:29) to His image.


Service
This one is about serving others as Christ served us. Humbling ourselves so that others may be raised. In Gal 5:13, Paul says, “For you were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another.” Service should not just be about duty. It shouldn't be about just doing it because you know you should. Often it feels like this, however, usually because we want to put ourselves higher than other people; we want to be served, rather than serve. We want what we want. “I don't feel like it,” we often complain. Notice how that statement is all about us? “I” is getting in the way. Our self is being selfish. One of the ways we can die to self is by putting others before ourselves by serving them.
Something to ponder: How can you serve and put others above yourself in your daily life?

Stewardship
We were put on earth to care for God's creation. Even before the Fall, “The LORD God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it” (Gen 2:15). How we use our resources is important. As stewards of God's creation, we are called to use both our physical and human resources to his glory. 1 Peter 4:10 says, “As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God's varied grace.”
Wherever your talents lie, you need to be using them to God's glory and in His Service, however that might be.
The world tells us that we belong to ourselves and that we can do anything we want with and to ourselves. We can mutilate our flesh, be promiscuous, over- or under-eat, recklessly endanger ourselves, but as long as it “just” affects us, the world says that it is okay. However, 1 Cor 6:19 says “Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own.”
We are called to use the resources we are blessed with to God's glory--food, money, our health, etc.--because they are not ours, but His, and that is our purpose.
Some things to ponder: Do you use the food He provides to His glory? Do you treat your body as a temple of the Holy Spirit when it comes to food? Have you honoured God by what you have put in your mouth today?


Hospitality
This, in a way, is where everything comes together. Hospitality is “the act, practice, or quality of being hospitable; friendly and generous entertainment of guests” (Webster's Dictionary). However, just having people over to visit does not mean that you are practising hospitality. You can have guests over and still not be a hospitable host or hostess. If you are having people over just to show off your home or your stuff, that is not being hospitable. Hospitality is about the other person or people, not yourself. It is service through sharing our home, our time, and ourselves in love with others. (Often, of course, food is involved, too.)

In closing:
Our NOURIS2H assignment is about using our head, hands, and hearts in God's service, showing our thankfulness for what He has done for us.

So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” 1 Corinthians 10:31
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Head, Heart, Hands: Christ is Lord of All




The Practical Side

What I am supposed to do for this assignment?

There are two parts to this assignment: the marked part and the non-marked part. Both parts must be completed in order for you to finish the assignment.

Nourishing Practically (Marked)
Weekly Task
  1. Cook or bake something new from scratch at least 1 time a week (no mixes or box meals: no Kraft dinner, Hamburger Helper, cake mixes, etc.)
  2. Plan and record your process (your report will be handed in)
  3. Present the food in an attractive way (take a picture; bring your picture and recipe in for the site)
  4. Serve the food to at least 1 other person (family or friend)
  5. Record the reaction of your family to the food you made
  6. Clean up afterward (you may have help )

Other Tasks
  1. At least twice during the course, serve a full, nutritionally-complete sit-down meal (Canada's Food Guide) to your family (you may include an appetizer and/or dessert) (Counts as your weekly task for that week)
    1. write out your plan
    2. choose foods that everyone in your family can enjoy and which meets their various nutritional needs
    3. cook the food (you may have help, but you are in charge and must do the bulk of the work)
    4. set the table properly (we will cover this in class)
    5. serve the food to your family
    6. clean up afterward (you may have help )

  2. At least twice during the course, go grocery shopping (with a family member is fine; you could do this the same week as your meal preparation). (One of these times should be after we have covered this subject in class.)
    • use your shopping skills to help budget
    • find the best deal on a food that your family eats frequently

Nourishing Others (Actual activity not marked. A monthly journal will be handed in.)

Practising Imagebearing
  • Be aware of opportunities for you to
    • “wash” the feet of others
    • up build people in your life
    • fellowship with family and friends
    • serve
    • steward the resources God has given you
    • show hospitality

To Hand in:

Nourishing Practically
Weekly Task 10 marks each:
  1. Recipe and pictures of both the process and your finished product
  2. Your Report on how things went and what you learned
  3. Reaction from your family

Format:
  • combine all these parts into a “blog” post (we will talk about this)
  • can be done in a Word document and uploaded to our NOURIS2H wiki or handed in on a usb.
How you put things together is up to you. Be creative!

Other tasks:
Meal Task 10 marks each (total of 20 marks):
  1. Recipe and pictures of both the process and your finished product
  2. Your Report
  3. Reaction from your family:

Shopping Task 5 marks each (10 marks total):
Written Report
    1. What did you learn?
    2. What skills did you use?
    3. How did you budget/save?

Nourishing Others:
Keep a notebook or text file on your computer:
  • log specific things you do, point form, be brief
  • complete a monthly journal: your reaction, other people's reaction, what have you noticed, etc.


Weekly Practical Rubric
Criteria
1
2
3
4
4
Writing engages the reader and is clear and specific.
Writing voice is stiff and robotic. Process is not communicated clearly.
Needs more work.
Writing voice is stiff and robotic.
Process is communicated quite clearly. Lots of refinement needed.
A clear writing voice is beginning to be established. Process is communicated clearly. Some refinement needed.
A clear writing voice is established. Process is communicated clearly and well. A bit more polish needed.
A clear writing voice is established. Process is communicated clearly and well. An enjoyable and interesting read.
Mechanics of language: grammar, spelling, punctuation
Many unnecessary and careless mistakes in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation. Needs serious editing and proofreading.
A number of careless mistakes in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation. Needs more careful editing and proofreading.
A few errors in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation. Extra attention to editing and proofreading needed in future.
One or two minor errors in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation
Mechanics are virtually flawless.
Layout is effective and draws the reader in.
Layout is jumbled and incoherent. Does not progress in a logical order. Much more work needed.
Layout is somewhat unclear. Some parts do not flow clearly or logical. Much refining needed.
Layout is clear and neat. It flows logically, but could use more creative use of elements. Polish needed.
Layout is clear, aesthetically pleasing, and establishes a natural flow which draws the reader down the page. Some polish still needed.
Layout is clear, aesthetically pleasing, and establishes a natural flow which draws the reader down the page.
Excellent job.
Pictures of process and the finished product are included.
Images are lacking in quantity and quality/ images are not captioned clearly/ images are dull and uninteresting
Images are lacking in quantity or quality/ images are not captioned clearly/ images are slightly boring
Images are included, captioned clearly, and give a good picture of the experience.
Images are included, captioned clearly, and give a good picture of the experience.
Images are included, captioned clearly, and give a good picture of the experience. They entertain the reader.
Reactions from family and friends
Reactions are not included or names are not cited.
Reactions are included, but no attempt has been made to make them interesting.
Names not cited.
Reactions are included.
Names are cited.
Reactions are included in the body of the post or creatively included in some other way. Names are cited.
Reactions are included seamlessly in the body of the post or creatively included in some other way. Names are cited.
Skills learned in class and in the lab are applied effectively.
A variety of procedures, equipment, and technology have been used.
Recipe(s)/ food prepared:
  • Required some use or practice of skills learned in class
  • Required no real variety of procedures, equipment, and/or technology.
  • Difficulty level: easy. Provided no challenge.
Recipe(s)/ food prepared:
  • Required the use or practice of skills learned in class
  • Required a some variety of procedures, equipment, and/or technology.
  • Difficulty level not really a challenge for the student's level of skills
Recipe(s)/ food prepared:
  • Required the use or practice of skills learned in class
  • Required a variety of procedures, equipment, and/or technology.
  • Difficulty level: primarily required skills already mastered; one or two newer skills were used
Recipe(s)/ food prepared:
  • Required the use or practice of skills learned in class
  • Required a variety of procedures, equipment, and/or technology.
  • Difficulty level somewhat of a challenge for the student's level of skills; good mix of old and new skills were needed.
Recipe(s)/ food prepared:
  • Required the use or practice of skills learned in class
  • Required a variety of procedures, equipment, and/or technology.
  • Difficulty level really challenged the student's level of skills
  • The student was required to learn a new skill in order to successfully complete the recipe

Monthly Journal Rubric
Criteria

Writing communicates the student's experience clearly and specifically.

Mechanics of language: grammar, spelling, punctuation





Assignment Due Dates:
Due Date
Weekly Task
Journal
19 September 2011


26 September 2011


3 October 2011


7 October 2011
----------------------------
Due
17 October 2011


24 October 2011


31 October 2011


7 November 2011


11 November 2011
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Due
14 November 2011


21 November 2011


28 November 2011


5 December 2011


9 December 2011
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Due
12 December 2011


19 December 2011


13 January 2012
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Due